Browsing Tag

Kelly Slater

Reviews, Surf, Surf Reviews

Film Review: Surprise Excitement Party

September 13, 2013

“What the fuck are you watching? Surf porn?” That is what my wife asked after discovering me on the couch in boxers and 3D glasses watching our T.V. screen flash between boobs and breaks. This sounds, and to my wife looked, perversely incriminating but I had a good explanation for my compromising situation: I was watching and reviewing Transworld Surf’s “Surprise Excitement Party”. Though, I can’t understand why she was concerned, it isn’t that different from my normal boxers, Star Wars-watching position.

Possibly the reason she used the term “surf porn” (trademark pending) is because Surprise Excitement Party is the DVD equivalent of a man cave. While producing this film the folks at Transworld were obviously trying to appeal to the manly sentimentalities of their, sadly, predominately male audience: girls in bikinis, 3D footage, skydiving shots using GoPro cams, etc. But this hyper-manly, overtly sexual footage isn’t the main course.

3D

Surprise Excitement Party has some absolutely amazing and jaw dropping surfing. Deep barrels and acrobatic airs, normally absent from fashionable contemporary surf films, permeate Transworld’s film illustrating competition surf style rather than the current trend of “soul surfing”. Sorry, no longboards here folks. Regardless of style, all films should follow Surprise Excitement Party’s lead by filming in HD. The stunning HD footage is vivid and crisp; one can almost feel the wind blowing through Slater’s locks. Ironically, contrary to the vogue of current surf films, Transworld Surf is being more pure in its footage by actually 86ing the filters and projecting the most accurate vision, via HD footage, of what it is like to be in the water, on a surfboard.

0001-b8bbb629-4f0e8747-0c1b-f3889110

Surprise Excitement Party is Surf Porn indeed – it is pleasurable and easy. The film may not be a work of artistic visionary, which has to be analyzed and scrupulously picked apart, but it is entertaining. Surprise Excitement Party houses all the elements of a simple good time. The 3D scenes are childishly fun, the wipe out sequence is painfully hilarious and the GoPro shots are easy summed up as, “gnarly bro” (I can hear Jeff A. saying it now). The whole film is light. I mean, who wants Martin Scorsese directing their porno? If so, you may be at the wrong site.

So, for a good time grab a bottle of suntan lotion, lock the door and pop in a little surf porn.

– Patrick

Pick up your own copy of Surprise Excitement Party

Reviews, Surf, Surf Reviews

Film Review: Singlefin Yellow

August 23, 2013

Every surfboard has a story. I bought my first surfboard for $10 from a teenager on my block who my friends and I thought was the second coming of Kelly Slater, but more than likely he was a punk kid who dealt shit weed to middle schoolers. Anyway, the board was twelve inches thick, every neon color the 80s SoCal trend could conjure and sank even before it got into the water, but I cherished the thing. I rode it every weekend. Around thirteen or fourteen years old, I pestered my mom into buying me a new 5’8” …Lost and I never looked back.

After watching Singlefin Yellow by Jason Baffa I began to wonder who owned that $10 board before my gnarly neighbor. Secondly, what became of it after it was so quickly discarded? Is it in pieces scattered amongst garbage in a landfill or is it propped up in the “used” section of Dockside Surf Shop (my favorite surf shop growing up) awaiting another novice? Though I will never be able to answer these questions about my old friend, watching Baffa’s 2005 film allows me some closure by seeing the life of a Tyler made 9’6” yellow single fin as it passes beneath the feet of six surfers and then into the wild.

Single-fin-yellow-movie

Shot in 16mm film, Singlefin Yellow is sincere in its goal to follow the life and journey of a surfboard that was shaped in El Segundo, CA. The film shows a 1960s style yellow single fin longboard as it jet sets across the world and acquires stoke. Each surfer personally, and with warmth, narrates his or her portion of the film giving the entire movie an intimate feel. Singlefin Yellow gives insight to the connection between surfers but more importantly illustrates how surfboards are necessary conduits between riders.

Accepting the chain letter of dings and wax, each surfer in Singlefin Yellow slightly alters the board by surfing a certain break, trimming a certain way, or, like Bonga Perkins, thrashing the poor thing at the North Shore. Passed on, the longboard gives the next rider a sense of authenticity and soul that acts as a tie to the previous riders, the previous countries and the previous waves. None of us can deny that surfing is a sport of emotional connections and that these emotional connections change the feel of our tool – the surfboard. Changing hands over time the aura, for lack of a better word, of these boards shifts in small, minute ways. Singlefin Yellow is a 110-minute snapshot of this process.

Single-fin-yellow-movie

Lastly, I want to stress how much these simple planks of foam and fiberglass are similar to tools with which we create and Singlefin Yellow makes this apparent. Many will liken surfboards to art, but beneath the pretty, glassy exterior they are utensils and objects – tools with which we work. Even the surfing vernacular reflects our subconscious utilitarian perspective of the surfboard: we carve a wave and we trim a wave. Therefore, working with these tools in our salty mitts makes us the craftsman, the artisan working in conjunction with the surfboard. These tools are in our presence the very moment we are in the act of an extremely human process – creation. Later, as workers do, we exchange these tools; pass them amongst ourselves possibly because we need a new tool that will suit our current project. But, undoubtedly, impressions of ourselves remain with our past chisels and then are passed along to a new surfsmith – and this process, my friends, is the art and the beauty.

– Patrick

Pick up your own copy of Singlefin: Yellow

News

Surfers for Hurricane Sandy Relief

November 26, 2012

To help please visit these websites:
Waves for Water
Graybeards
NYSEA
Rebuild Recover
Mobile Disaster Relief App

Produced by: Paul De Luna and Sipping Jetstreams Media
Song: Bruce Springsteen No Surrender with Brian Fallon of The Gaslight Anthem / Sony Records
Edited by: Pete Rogers
Voice Over: Mikey De Temple
Special Thanks to: Bruce Springsteen, Brian Fallon of The Gaslight Anthem, Sony Records, Kelly Slater, Stephanie Gilmore, Mick Fanning, Rob Machado, Matt Wilkinson, Kassia Meador, Ian Walsh, Thomas Brookins, Mikey De Temple, Todd and Megan Diciurcio, Matt Clark, Will Skudin, Cliff Skudin,Spencer Wolff and everyone else who donated their time and resources.