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Gear

Patagonia’s 35L Black Hole Pack

April 24, 2015

One of the coolest items in our summer collection, is Patagonia’s 35L Black Hole Pack. Made with the same fabric as their Black Hole Duffel, this crossover pack is very weather-resistant, extremely durable and designed to carry your gear to the office, the crag or the beach. Check out the video for more information, and pick up your pack here.

Reviews, Surf, Surf Reviews

Glove Review: Patagonia R3 Gloves

October 23, 2013

To be honest, I hate gloves. Cumbersome comes to mind. Disconnected. Uncomfortable. For years I refused. And when I did wear them, the only thing I wanted to do was shake my hands feverishly like some kind of inspired spirit fingers performance – trying desperately to free myself from them. Oh, and did I mention that getting them on was no easier than getting them off? A real pain those goddamn gloves were. But when you start surfing in the winter, or the fall for that matter, they become more important. Because unless you’re some sort of Ice Man, like Arnold in that shitty Batman movie, your fingers are gonna freeze. So I caved and bought a pair, some 3mm gloves made by Matuse, or maybe they were made by O’neil. Anyhow. They kept my fingers from freezeing. For awhile. Then everything went to shit. The seams split and I wore a hole right through the palm, and they eventually let so much water in that I may as well have not beer wearing them.

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My second set was similar. They might have lasted a little longer, or perhaps I just didn’t care about cold fingers that fall. But they fell apart, and so did my third and fourth pair of paw warmers. Disgruntled I was. “Why the hell can’t someone make a pair of mitts that won’t fall apart so fast?!” “Dude,” a friend replied, “gloves are only good for three months, tops!” Bullshit! I’ve owned wetsuits for longer than I’ve owned cars, longer than I dated my high school girlfriend. So if that shit can stick together so well, why can’t they get their glove glue together?!

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Enter the R3. Now you gotta know I was skeptical of these gloves – with that fuzzy white wool on the inside and the rubber cement covered seams. Karissa had owned an earlier iteration of the R3 and they had, like my friend suggested, lasted her just two or three months… tops. But these looked better, well built if you will. And so here I sit, some six months into ownership, wearing a pair of gloves which appear entirely unaffected by the use and abuse they’ve received. They’ve survived sunset sessions in spring, early mornings in May, evenings in August and now October, which is all kinds of cold. And the entire time these gloves have not only kept my fingers from freezing, but provided additional grabability and are easier to get on and off than anything else I’ve owned. 4/5 as far as I’m concerned. We’ll see how the work this winter!

You can pick up your own pair of Patagonia R3 Gloves, here.

Justin Coffey is known to enjoy small waves, strong drinks, motorcycles and misbehaving. He’s also the guy that runs Peanut Butter Coast.

Reviews, Surf, Surf Reviews

Glove Review: Patagonia R5 Lobster Claws

April 2, 2013

Here in the Pacific Northwest, a good set of gloves is essential to your survival. With water temperatures barely above fifty degrees farenheit, keeping your fingers from freezing is an important part of surfing successfully. I’ve tried all types, everything from 5mm five-fingers to 7mm lobster claws with a spot to wipe your snot. But it wasn’t until I picked up these Patagonia R5 gloves that I found something which was both warm and and easy to wear. Boom!

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I suppose they’re a little snug, but they won’t stop the red stuff from finding your fingers. Made from 7mm neoprene and lined with merino wool, the Gucci gloves feel like they’re half as thick and twice as warm as anything else I’ve worn. A lot like my old lobster claws – three plus one and a thumb – Patagonia’s R5 gloves will make you look like Oswald Cobblepot. But I’ll be damned if my digits don’t stay warm in the winter! Yes, they are expensive, but like most everything, you get what you pay for. Because a good pair of gloves won’t just keep you warm, they’ll let you surf till sunset. So if you’re in the market for a proper pair, pick up some of these here Patagonia gloves.

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J.W.

Justin Coffey is known to enjoy small waves, strong drinks, motorcycles and misbehaving. He’s also the guy that runs Peanut Butter Coast.

Interviews, Surf, Surf Interviews

Keith Malloy: Patagonia, Fatherhood & Torpedo People

February 8, 2013

Keith was pushed into his first wave when he was four years old. He went pro in his teens. By twenty-five, he’d circled the world ten times. With such experience, it comes as no surprise that he’s an artisan of all forms of wave riding. Recently, I was lucky enough to connect with Keith (Thanks Aaron.) Hes described as a man of few words Heres 538.

A few years back I saw a shot of you surfing off the Washington coast. How was it?
We really had an amazing trip to the northwest. I think we got really lucky with the weather and waves. I don’t want to name any spots, but there are some great lefts up there. Both my wife and I are goofy foot, so we were taking advantage of being front-side. Walking throughout the crazy old growth forests with bald eagles soaring overhead was so cool. I really enjoy the northwest, it’s pretty magical. I hope I go back some day soon and surf it again.

Patagonia wetsuits have become pretty damn popular up here in the Pacific Northwest. You, Dan and Chris are all ambassadors. What initially got you guys involved with Patagonia?
We started with Patagonia about 10 years ago. We really resonated with the company’s core values and philosophy. I also grew up in Ventura, CA where Patagonia is based. I ended up surfing and becoming friends with Yvon and Fletcher. Eventually our friendship turned into a partnership, and I’ve been working with them ever since. It’s been great to work on the wetsuit designs and see them just get better and better. We definitely build suits for the colder regions… it’s great to hear that people in your area wear them, and like them.


Chris Burkard Photography

Can you please tell me the story behind this shot?
We traveled to Norway to surf. We ended up surfing an overhead left point break near the cabin we were staying at. Fortunately for me we had the wood burning hot tub on the deck. So, ?after surfing frigid water in the snow, you could find me chilling and drinking beers in the hot tub. I’ll be honest, I was a bit giddy as it all seemed surreal.

Is it true in 2021 Patagonia will be introducing an R5 wetsuit for the Great Lakes surfers, and that for extra warmth they will be cross-stitching hair from your beard in with the merino wool?
Hahahaha. I hope not.

You and your wife had a baby a few years back. How has fatherhood shaped your creative endeavors?
My family and I are basically a team, my wife helps me with everything I do. ?We finished ?the bodysurf movie Come Hell or High Water over the time our child was being born, it was crazy! We just finished a book about the movie. It’s called Plight of the Torpedo People. ?Believe me, it is a juggling act with a kid! ?Not sure how we got it all done!

What are some of your passions outside the water?
I also like hunting, fishing and riding horses. ?We have a big population of wild invasive pigs in our area and I like hunting them with a bow. My Dad has a small cattle ranch and I help him out a bit. My biggest commitment is my two year old daughter and wife, but luckily they like the beach and ranch life too.

It’s been two years since the release of Come Hell or High Water. Any great adventures in 2012? What’s on the menu for 2013?
I traveled quite a bit after the movie, Kamchaka Russia was an insane trip. Like no place i have ever been. We were surfing in the midst of volcanoes, bears and salmon. The beach breaks were hollow with crystal clear water. The water temp was below 50. We found some amazing river mouth, but unfortunately the swell never got very big.

It was a pretty hardcore trip, we camped for 14 days and no showers. We were sleeping in tents and in between camps we were driving a 6 wheel army vehicle. The highlight of my trip was catching salmon on the fly rod.

2013, hmm, not sure, usually don’t plan things farther than a week in advance! I just got back from a trip to Barbados, we timed it with swell and got amazing waves. Not sure creatively whats next, but I have a few ideas.


Tim Davis

You can pick up your own copies of Come Hell or High Water, and Plight of the Torpedo People, on the official site.

Check out our review of Come Hell or High Water, here. We also sell the DVD in our shop.

Reviews, Surf, Surf Reviews

Wetsuit Review: Patagonia Men’s Hooded R4 Full Suit

December 10, 2012

I was many things that morning – hungover, half awake and hungry – but what I wasn’t, not even little bit, was cold. It was the second Saturday in October, and the first weekend I felt like it really started to get cold on the coast. There was a northwest wind kicking over the ocean, leaving us with nothing but white capped waves. Shoulda brought some soap and washed my whites ;) But that’s beside the point. This is about staying warm when it’s windy and well below 40 degrees. When a warm shower and a cold beer go hand in hand. And I’ll be damned if my new Patagonia R4, a gift from my ever wonderful wife, didn’t keep me nice and cozy that cold morning on the coast.

The R4 is Patagonia’s warmest wetsuit. Lined with merino wool, it is admittedly cumbersome, but I’ll exert a little extra effort if it means surfing for four hours instead of forty-five minutes. At first glance, the R4 might look a lot like other 5/4 wetsuits you’ve owned over the years. But then you begin to see the subtleties. The front-zip function is unlike others, with the flap folding flat across your chest – letting little to no water in – assuming you have your hood on. And then there’s the single, albeit small, neck opening, into which one must squeeze themselves. But once you’ve learned to drag one side of the suit down around your elbow, to shrug your shoulders and shake that shit off, the in-and-out stuff becomes simple. Sorta.

At the ankles and wrists you’ll notice a thick, tear-resistant material made to withstand the up-and-down action that comes with wearing both boots and gloves in the winter. And then there’s the wool – a white fuzzy lining that leaves a waffle pattern on your extremities after a few hours. It might itch a little, or maybe it just feels like a classic Christmas sweater, but again, I’ll take patterned imprints and a lil’ itch over ice cold arms any day. I’ll be damned if the wool ain’t warm!

And now I’ll talk about the price. Because it’s more than most – but not by much. A hundred dollars? One-fifty? But if that’s what it takes to stay warm in the winter, you can collect my coin. Spent four or maybe five hours surfing that Saturday. In water that won’t get any warmer till June or maybe July. And once you’re passed the price and you’ve sorted out how to slide your self in and out of the suit, you’ll never look back. You’ll wonder why you owned anything else, why you surfed so many short sessions, why you didn’t just spend a little more scratch so you could stay warm.

– Justin Coffey

You can pick up your own Men’s Patagonia R4 Wetsuit, here.

Justin Coffey is known to enjoy small waves, strong drinks, motorcycles and misbehaving. He’s also the guy that runs Peanut Butter Coast.

Interviews, Surf, Surf Interviews

Aaron Smith – Destination Surf x Patagonia

December 5, 2012

Aaron Smith is the owner of Destination Surf. Destination is a family run business, that was started by Aaron’s father…over thirty years ago. They make killer board bags. Outside Destination…Aaron represents Patagonia’s surf division, up here in the Pacific Northwest. He helps us pick out our suits, has beer with me when he’s in town, and tolerates me photo-shopping roller-blades on him…when I don’t get my way. He’s a great guy. You should know more about him.

When and where did you learn how to surf?
I learned to surf in Encinitas CA. I was around 5 or 6, my first time standing up. My dad taught me how to surf. He grew up surfing in Leucadia Becons, Swamis, and Moonlight Beach.

What are you riding these days?
I mainly ride 6’ thrusters…but I do have some quad fishes from DK, and a Christenson 10’6 glider.

What’s your most memorable moment out in the water?
I happened to be in Florida in 91’ when the perfect storm hit. I surfed some of the biggest surf on the east coast. I also got my first shot in Surfer Magazine.

What are some of your other interests?
Free diving, BJJ, and Mountain Biking

How did Destination Surf come to be?
My dad has been in the industry since he got out of High school in Encinitas. He started with surfboards, and and owned a surf shop in Encinitas called Ocean Pacific. He eventually sold the store…which later became OP clothing. After that, my dad took a break and moved our family to Coeur d’Alene,  Idaho. When Mt St Helens blew, we moved back to San Diego.

He started what would become Destination Surf. At first we distributed all sorts of Surf products; Sticky bumps, Aloha racks, etc. As our brand became more popular we started dropping all other products, and focused more on the Destination brand. Our big thing is travel bags. We made our first bag in 1980. Now we have traction, leashes and packs coming soon.

You have a really great team of Destination riders…spent any time out in the water with them?
I’ve surfed with most of them, with the exception of Jamie Sterling. He rides way too big of waves for me. I’ve been to Fiji with Aamion Goodwin, and the Malloys. It’s always great to see thosee guys surf. They have so much wave knowledge and ability.

Destination recently relocated to Oceanside, Ca. How’s the new home treating you?
Its good. Close to the Harbor for morning sessions. It’s also down in the board building area of Oceanside…so there’s lots of likeminded people.


Outside Destination, you’re also Patagonia’s West Coast Surf representative. How did you get involved with Patagonia?
During the economic down turn in 2008 I was thinking of adding some products to distribute at Destination surf. About the same time Devon Howard, then Manager of the Cardiff Patagonia store…asked if I knew anyone who could rep Patagonia to the surf shop.I jumped at the chance. It’s been an amazing ride!

What’s on the menu for 2013?
For Patagonia, we have all new suits coming in July. New stretch wool, and completely sealed suits. They are insane!! Patagonia also has some new Eco Materials coming out. Stay tuned!

Destination has a new line up of traction pads. I’m also working on a new double short board bag. Travel has changed. Smaller boards and less boards. We need a new bag.

Connect:
Destination Surf – Facebook
Destination Stuff – Stoke Harvester
Patagonia Wetsuits – Stoke Harvester

News

Patagonia + Yulex = First Alternative to the Traditional Neoprene Wetsuit

November 17, 2012

Our friends at Patagonia, have teamed up with Yulex Corp, to created the surfing world’s first non-neoprene based wetsuit. Yulex specializes in creating sustainable, and health-friendly biomaterials…made from guayule (Parthenium argentatum.) Guayule is a shrub, found in the southern United States & Mexico.

The new Patagonia wetsuits are 60% guayule, and apparently 30% stretchier than their neoprene counterparts. Patagonia and Yulex hope to create a 100% guyale wetsuit in the future. Patagonia plans to introduce the suits in Japan, but will be rolling them out of their Ventura, Ca facility in Spring 2013.

Yulex’s official press release can be read below:

VENTURA, Calif. and PHOENIX, ARIZONA (November 16, 2012) — Patagonia Inc., a leading designer of core outdoor, surf and sport-related apparel, equipment, footwear and accessories, and Yulex Corporation, a clean technology company developing agricultural-based biomaterials for medical, consumer, industrial and bioenergy products, announced today the introduction of a guayule-based wetsuit, a renewable biorubber that is the first alternative to traditional fossil-based neoprene.

“When we started to build wetsuits we knew that neoprene, by nature of its production, was the most environmentally harmful part the product. Our initial approach was to use innovative materials, like wool, that are highly insulating and allowed us to use as little neoprene as possible. But we quickly realized that we needed to create a new material that could be a true alternative to neoprene,” notes Jason McCaffrey, Patagonia’s surf director. “After four years of working together, Patagonia and Yulex have co-developed a unique material that allows us to make a wetsuit that is 60% guayule (plant) based. Our goal is to have the formula be 100% plant based, but we feel that for now this new material is a big enough step forward to let the world know it is possible to buy something cleaner. This is just the first step; it’s our hope that other brands see this as interesting and join the effort to innovate and implement alternatives to traditional neoprene that is used in wetsuits.”

Yulex’s biorubber material is made from guayule, a renewable, non-food crop that requires very little water, is grown domestically in the US, uses no pesticides, and in comparison to traditional neoprene, has a very clean manufacturing process.

Initially, the new suits will be available in Japan only. In Spring 2013, surfers will be able to order custom suits out of Patagonia’s wetsuit facility in Ventura, CA, with a global rollout to follow.

“Yulex commends Patagonia for supporting the advancement of a sustainable, low-carbon future by embracing agricultural-based, biomaterials to replace petroleum-based synthetics,” said Jeff Martin, CEO, president and founder of Yulex Corporation. “Patagonia is guiding the action sports industry to a new level and setting an example for the importance of sustainable practices. Yulex views this partnership as a major step towards a future where use of our renewable, guayule-based biomaterials is the industry standard for consumer, medical, industrial and bioenergy products.”

About Patagonia:
Patagonia, Inc., based in Ventura, California, is a leading designer of core outdoor, surf and sport-related apparel, equipment, footwear and accessories. With sales last year of $540M, the company is noted internationally for its commitment to authentic product quality and environmental activism, contributing over $47.5M in cash and in-kind donations to date. Incorporating environmental responsibility into product development, the company has, since 1996, used only organically grown cotton in its clothing line. Committed to making its products landfill-free, the company’s entire product line is recyclable thorough its Common Threads Initiative. The company also advocates corporate transparency through its interactive website, The Footprint Chronicles, which outlines the environmental and social footprint of individual products. Patagonia was featured as The Coolest Company on the Planet on Fortune Magazine’s April 2007 cover.

About Yulex Corporation: 

Yulex Corporation has developed a portfolio of biomaterials derived from the U.S. grown guayule plant. The company’s technological innovation is designed to replace traditional tropical or petroleum based rubber for consumer, industrial and medical markets, with the residual agricultural materials utilized as a feedstock for bioenergy. Yulex collaborates with customers to develop and market highly differentiated, premium performance products in an ecologically responsible, sustainable manner. For more, visit http://www.yulex.com.

 

Retro Stoke Harvester

Keith Malloy: Patagonia R4 Wetsuits

September 28, 2012


Surf Ambassador Keith Malloy, talks about is experience wearing the Patagonia R4 wetsuit. Malloy takes on the three-dog night waters of Norway, with neoprene & merino wool.

“With the technology of these wetsuits, surf destinations that have never been surfed before are actually a possibility. I think that is where surf exploration is headed.”